7 Simple Steps to Getting Organized for Starting Seeds Indoors
Garden

7 Simple Tips to Getting Organized Before Starting Seeds Indoors

Starting seeds can seem like a daunting process but once you get yourself organized and chart it all out, it’s pretty easy to do.

In Part 3 of learning how to start seeds indoors, we will review how to organize your seed starting schedule to help you know when to do what.

And be sure to grab your FREE downloadable printable at the end of this post!

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How to Start Seeds Indoors Without a Greenhouse

To quickly recap Parts 1 and 2 of my seed starting series:

In Part 1, I shared how to start seeds indoors without a greenhouse. And if you do have a greenhouse, I’ve got you covered there too.

In Part 2, I showed you how I set up my seed starting system in the basement. Since I am starting seeds without a greenhouse, we reviewed all the supplies that I am using.

Now that we covered both the overview and supplies, let’s talk about how to get yourself organized.

Supplies Needed to Getting Organized Before Starting Seeds

  1. seeds
  2. notebook or journal
  3. pen or pencil
  4. calendar
Colorful Garden at the Garden Shed

7 Simple Tips to Getting Organized Before Starting Seeds

The purpose of getting organized is to help you know how many supplies you need and when to start sowing the seeds.

I don’t know about you, but if I don’t organize myself, the task seems daunting.

Laying it all out on paper is really helpful to see what the sowing schedule will look like.

Flowers that Butterflies Love

So organizing, journaling and calendaring is a huge help when starting seeds.

Here’s what to do:

  1. Grab your seed packets, pen and a notebook or a garden journal. Have your calendar handy. (I just use my phone.)
  2. Organize seed packets by plant.
  3. I like to make it look like a spreadsheet, so make columns for Days to Maturity, Seed Germination, Sow Date, Flower Color, Overall Size and Amount of Sun. The information can be found on the back of each seed packet.
  4. In the rows, start with each plant then name each variety underneath.
  5. Grab the information from each seed packet and drop into your list.
  6. Calendar the sow dates for each plant and variety. You will need to know your last frost date to calendar this.
  7. When complete, clean up the list and add to a spreadsheet or garden journal so it’s easy to make changes during the growing season.
How to Start Seeds Indoors Without a Greenhouse

After I charted when to start all of my seeds, I noticed my sweet peas are the first seeds to be sown. They need to be started 10-12 weeks before the last frost date. So the earliest I can sow them here in my zone is February 20.

My good friend Kim from Shiplap and Shells just shared an amazing post all about how to start sweet pees from seed as well as how to care for them. You can read all about it HERE.

Photo by Kim at Shiplap and Shells

Aren’t they so gorgeous?

In case you want a little more direction about how to organize yourself, check out my FREE Downloadable Printable below.

Next in the series, we’ll cover what you need to know about sowing seeds indoors without a greenhouse and the lessons I learned along the way.

Want To Get More Organized to Start Seeds?

CLICK HERE to get my FREE DOWNLOADABLE PRINTABLE that will help you get organized to sow seeds this year. Print as many pages as you want and add to your gardening journal for ease of reference during the growing season.

How to Start Seeds Indoors Without a Greenhouse Series

Shop for Seed Starting Supplies

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7 Simple Tips to Getting Organized for Starting Seeds Indoors
7 Simple Tips to Getting Organized for Starting Seeds Indoors
7 Simple Tips to Getting Organized for Starting Seeds Indoors

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12 Comments

  1. I noticed a multiple plug with surge protection. Did you know these only last 10 years? Put a notice on the last day of your calendar like, “replace multi-plug in office 2031” or “Garden plug needs replacing 2030” I’ve heard this on Pinterest or somewhere like it, and I know from personal experience. My niece lives in a 100 year plus year old house and had a housefire. It wasn’t from anything old in the house, it was from a surge protector; one of the newer gadgets we all seem to have.

  2. I noticed a multiple plug with surge protection. Did you know these only last 10 years? Put a notice on the last day of your calendar like, “replace multi-plug in office 2031” or “Garden plug needs replacing 2030” I’ve heard this on Pinterest or somewhere like it, and I know from personal experience. My niece lives in a 100 year plus year old house and had a housefire. It wasn’t from anything old in the house, it was from a surge protector; one of the newer gadgets we all seem to have.

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